Force Science News

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Force Science News #213: When you don’t see what’s visible: The inattentional blindness factor & more

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FS training note: Congratulations to the graduates of our most recent Force Science Certification Course conducted last week in Alexandria, VA. They proudly represented 34 agencies from four countries and 19 states and provinces. Once again it was an honor to work with such an impressive group of professionals who we’re proud to welcome to the ranks of Certified Force Science Analysts!

A special thanks to the outstanding staff at the Department of Homeland Security’s Consolidated Training Center and to the Center’s former Division Director and current Project Manager for the U.S. Dept. of State’s Diplomatic Security Division, Ron Libby, who is also a Certified Force Science Analyst. We were honored that Ron, a Certified Force Science Analyst, made a guest appearance and shared a motivating opening presentation that set the pace for this excellent group.

[Click here for the upcoming Force Science Certification Course schedule or visit www.forcescience.org.]

In this edition:

I. When you don’t see what’s visible: The inattentional blindness factor

II. Research findings mark the dismal toll of police stress

III. Coming to courtroom near you: more brain scans of violent suspects

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Written by Force Science Institute

September 27th, 2012 at 1:51 pm

Posted in Force Science News

Force Science News #212: First study of Taser use against minors: No significant harm

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I. First study of Taser use against minors: No significant harm

Juveniles are one of the population groups thought by some observers to be “potentially vulnerable” to unexpected significant injury from being Tasered. But the first study of real-world use of conducted electrical weapons on minors concludes that zaps from CEWs “during apprehension of adolescents does not seem to pose unacceptable levels of risk.”

None of the sample pool of young offenders analyzed suffered anything worse than mild injuries, specifically “superficial puncture wounds” from Taser probes and “superficial abrasions and mild lacerations,” most likely from falls or struggles with police.

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Written by Force Science Institute

September 11th, 2012 at 1:50 pm

Posted in Force Science News

Force Science News #211: Latest developments in Taser heart-safety controversy

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After a broad-based, in-depth study of real-world applications, an independent research team says its findings “suggest” that department policies restricting the firing of Taser probes to the chest because of heart safety concerns “are unnecessary.”

Case analysts led by Dr. William Bozeman of the Wake Forest University School of Medicine in North Carolina determined that conducted electrical weapon (CEW) discharges impacting on the front torso are no more dangerous than those delivered to other parts of a suspect’s body.

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Written by Force Science Institute

August 23rd, 2012 at 1:47 pm

Posted in Force Science News

Force Science News #210: Research roundup: New studies on use of force, ExDS, sleep, & more

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I. Survey documents significant police “restraint” in use of deadly force

LEOs use deadly force far less often than they’re legally justified in doing, in contrast to a media-fueled public impression that excessive force by America’s cops is “general and widespread,” according to a recent survey of police/citizen encounters.

While officers kill an average of about 385 subjects a year, this toll, in fact, reflects significant restraint, authors of the study conclude. A “large number of officers,” they report, “have been in multiple situations in which they could have used deadly force, but resolved the incident without doing so and while avoiding serious injury.”

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Written by Force Science Institute

August 15th, 2012 at 1:39 pm

Posted in Force Science News

Force Science News #209: “Feeding the Animals”: 10 tips for winning with the media after an OIS

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The 2013 Force Science Certification Course schedule has just been released. Registrations are now being taken for all classes. Click here for the full schedule and course information or visit www.forcescience.org

At the latest ILEETA training conference, Rick Rosenthal, a veteran TV news anchor who’s now a law enforcement consultant, delivered some mixed metaphors you might find comforting as you contemplate the possibility of an OIS in your jurisdiction and the publicity firestorm that may well ignite in its aftermath.

• The media are not the bone-crushing, “900-pound gorilla” that many in police work imagine, he said. “That’s a myth.”

• When the media show up and try to get you to jump, you don’t have to “play frog.”

• With proper planning, you won’t become “media roadkill.”

You (or someone from your agency) will have to deal with reporters when news breaks. “Engagement is inevitable,” Rosenthal said. “Victory is only optional.”

These days, after more than 30 years in broadcast journalism, many of them with Chicago superstation WGN, he spends full time training law enforcement in “key strategies and tactics for winning with the media.”

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Written by Force Science Institute

July 27th, 2012 at 1:37 pm

Posted in Force Science News